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    • #14545
      Danni
      Guest

      We just bought a newly rehabbed house in Center City Philadelphia, with a finished basement and indoor outdoor carpeting. After the recent 8 inches of rain we’ve been inundated with wet carpets. The water seems to leak in from the wall in the back of the house and the side. We’ve got a small brick yard in back. There is only one small window in the front of the basement, where the laundry room is. Although some water was on the laundry room floor, it dried quickly and was pretty inconsequental compared to the finished part of the basement in the basement which is saturated still. There is no drain or sump pump.

      Any ideas of what I I’m facing repair wise to prevent this and for now, how can I dry it out? We’ve had fans on for days, used wet dry vacs and a steam cleaner to pull up water, but eight gallons later we’ve still got damp carpet who’s mildewy smell is starting to travel through the Central Airconditioning vents.

    • #83522
      Jay J
      Guest

      Danni,

      First and foremost (as you probably already know), you need to dry out the basement first. Take up the carpeting and either clean it or throw it out. If there’s ANYTHING else that’s absorbed water, either throw it out, clean it, or get it outside to dry. Then, open as many basement windows as you can and set your fan to PUSH your basement air to the outside. DON’T draw in outside air because you’ll only encourage the odors to travel through the home. If necessary, open a window upstairs that’s closest to the basement door.

      Since the past storm is a 100 year storm, well, maybe you don’t need to do anything to prevent this from happening. BUT, on the other hand, like you, if it were me, I’d at least look into it. W/O seeing what you have for a set-up, go ahead and call in a contractor or 3 to do an estimate. It doesnt’ mean you have to have the work done. When you compare them to each other, you’ll learn what’s involved from all of them. I suggest you wait a few weeks because right now, the contractors are SWAMPED with calls. Unless you’re DEFINITELY getting the work done, you won’t see them for an estimate. They’re gonna do the jobs that are paying! In the meantime, make sure your gutters are clear and you have some ‘sloping’ away from the house and your downspouts are carrying water at least 3′ from the home. Other than that, maybe someone else can say more.

      My best to ya and hope this helps.

      Jay J

    • #83524
      TomR
      Guest

      Hi, Danni:

      Interestingly enough I rehabbed a row house in Society Hill, Philly, awhile back, and was faced with a similar problem. The repair essentially entailed digging a trench around the perimeter of the basement and running a underground drain, which in turn fed a sump pump. There was also a need to waterproof the walls, or something like that, because the house I was working on was 230 years old, and there was something about the foundation walls that needed special attention.

      Anyway, it was messy, but this particular home did not have a finished basement. The floor was concrete, so jackhammers were necessary. Now, I did not do the work. The homeowners used a company named Dr. Desert Dry, which has been in the Philly area for a long time. I’m assuming they still are. They had a great reputation. I believe the work was $2500. They were very well regarded, and guaranteed their work.

      If that sounds expensive, there are other ways, including sealing the basement walls and floor with special paint, and adding special channels to the perimeter floor to collect and distribute the water without the need for digging. They all work to different degrees. It’s kind of the old get-what-you-pay-for story. Due to the special tools required, basement digging is really not a DIY affair. Also, the nature of a row home, with a residence on either side and sharing common walls, opens up other issues. You don’t want to compromise a party wall. Of course, you did not say you have a row home, but I’m not familiar with much else in Center City.

      As it turned out, I was done with my portion of the home before the owners did anything with the basement, so I have never worked with them in a retrofit situation. However, my current home, located outside of Doylestown, was built with the Desert Dry system back in 1954. It has no sump pump, and hat no problem at all. The only problem was due to my neglect in not cleaning out the gutters, which caused one to spill over and allow water to enter through a vent well. Even then, no water reached the floor.

      I would suggest getting them in for a free estimate, especially now when it is wet and they can see what’s going on. I would also get in others for different estimates. Just because one company is good does not mean others are not equally up to the task. And the problem may be much more simple than I am projecting.

      Good luck, and let us know what you find out.

    • #83540
      Ron
      Guest

      I know from college pranks that the carpeting will still be wet after 4 to 6 months.

      Remove it in order to dry it, or pitch it out.

    • #225053
      Dinesh patel
      Guest

      JAY,

      IN HEAVY RAIN MY BASE IS FLOODING. IF YOU HAVE ANY IDEA.

      P

      PLEASE GIVE ME SUGGESTION.

      MY HOME PHONE NO. 781-272-4693

      508-849-2826

      MY E-MAIL ADDRESS DINESHP17@HOTMAIL.COM

      THANK YOU

      DINESH PATEL

    • #225055
      Dinesh patel
      Guest

      JAY,

      IN HEAVY RAIN MY BASE IS FLOODING. IF YOU HAVE ANY IDEA.

      PLEASE GIVE ME SUGGESTION.

      MY HOME PHONE NO. 781-272-4693(EVENING)

      508-849-2826(DAY)

      MY E-MAIL ADDRESS DINESHP17@HOTMAIL.COM

      THANK YOU

      DINESH PATEL

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